/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background0.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background1.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background10.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background11.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background12.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background13.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background14.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background2.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background3.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background4.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background5.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background6.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background7.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background8.png
/fls/1900/site_graphics/siteBackgrounds/home/background9.png
Pete's Ponderings-March 2
Courtesy: New Mexico State University  
Release:  03/03/2009

This Saturday there will be another Ring of Honor ceremony that ole Pete loves so much. The latest inductees are the truest recipients of the honor for their sport. Ann McReynolds, Anita Maxwell and Chris Veatch are the incarnation of the evolution of women’s basketball at New Mexico State through the past 33 years. When Karen Fey started the women’s programs it was because of a shove from the federal government called Title IX. It meant that gals had to have the same chance as guys to play at the top level of their game in the NCAA arenas.

 

In 1976 when McReynolds started her hoops career, the teams weren’t much more than intramural teams that played within a 200 mile radius, since that was all there was back then. She was a dominant player even though sports were funded at a primitive level in high school and didn’t exist in grades lower than that. McReynolds led the team in scoring and rebounding and was the workhorse that led her team to 24 victories in 1977 winning 70 percent of her games through her three years of eligibility. She is still tops in rebounding average and second in blocked shots, even though she only played for three years. Her natural athletic ability made her head and shoulders above those who tried but failed to contain her on the court.

 

Maxwell was the first modern age “Super Star” for women’s teams at NM State. She was a basketball player as opposed to an athlete who chose to play basketball. She was hands down, the best player in the Big West from 1993-96. Freshman of the Year and then three times chosen all conference and Player of the Year and named each time to the postseason conference tournament team as well. Her coach, Mike Petersen was one smart hombre. He designed an offense to take advantage of Maxwell’s strengths and it paid off in the win column. Maxwell was the homecoming queen her senior year and played for the WNBA Cleveland Rockers in their inaugural season.

 

Veatch was recruited by one coach, but came into her own under Joe McKeown. The feisty McKeown has the distinction of being the only women’s hoop coach to make it to the NCAA playoffs. He did it with Veatch leading the team in rebounding and sharing scoring honors with Vicki Evans. Veatch was the first Roadrunner hoopster to excel in a transition offense.

 

Ole Pete will be welcoming these three ladies back to the campfire this weekend for their induction into the Women’s Basketball Ring of Honor. They truly are the foundation of the sport here at NM State.



‹ New Mexico State Aggie Athletics


advertisement
Photo Galleries

Mobile Apps